Aftermath of Munich air disaster: In pictures

The deaths, survivors and aftermath of Munich air disaster in pictures, that killed 23 individuals in including eight a plane carrying the Manchester United team crashed on February 6 1958.

The Munich air disaster occurred on 6 February 1958 when British European Airways flight 609 crashed on its third attempt to take off from a slush-covered runway at Munich-Riem Airport, West Germany. The disaster killed 23 individuals including 8 players of Manchester United, who were returning from a European Cup match in Belgrade, former Yugoslavia, against Red Star Belgrade. The match was drawn 3–3 at the Partizan Stadion but it was enough to send United to the semi-finals of the prestigious European Cup.

Seven of Manchester United’s players died immediately during the fateful crash (Geoff Bent, Roger Byrne, Eddie Colman, Mark Jones, David Pegg, Tommy Taylor and Liam Whelan), and their prolific prodigy Duncan Edwards died from his injuries on 21 February at the Rechts der Isar Hospital in Munich after 15 days of battle. Right winger Johnny Berry and versatile center-half Jackie Blanchflower were both injured so severely that they never played again. United’s manager Sir Matt Busby was in the flight as well and was seriously injured and had to stay in hospital for more than two months after the crash.

After the crash, United only won one league game that shattered title challenge and they eventually fell to ninth place in the league. In the European Cup semi-finals, they managed to beat Milan at Old Trafford but were demolished 4–0 at the San Siro. Sir Matt Busby, who survived the crash, had returned later and continued his managerial duties the next season (1958–59), and eventually ten years later won the European Cup, beating Benfica in 1968. Sir Bobby Charlton and Bill Foulkes were the only two crash survivors who lined up in that team.

“I thought, ‘Why me? Why am I here with nothing happened to me other than a little gash on the head’ and all these other friends had been killed? – Sir Bobby Charlton

The golden generation, managed by legendary Matt Busby, who were fondly known as the Busby babes will never be forgotten.

6th February 1958, The snow covered fuselage, part of the wreckage of the B,E,A, Elizabethan airliner G-ALZU 'Lord Burghley' after the crash at Munich in which 23 people died, 8 being Manchester United footballers (Photo by Popperfoto/Getty Images)
6th February 1958, The snow covered fuselage, part of the wreckage of the B,E,A, Elizabethan airliner G-ALZU ‘Lord Burghley’ after the crash at Munich in which 23 people died, 8 being Manchester United footballers (Photo by Popperfoto/Getty Images)

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Rescue workers pictured in a snowstorm at the wreckage of the B,E,A, Elizabethan airliner G-ALZU 'Lord Burghley' after the crash at Munich in which 23 people died, 8 being Manchester United footballers (Photo by Popperfoto/Getty Images)
Rescue workers pictured in a snowstorm at the wreckage of the B,E,A, Elizabethan airliner G-ALZU ‘Lord Burghley’ after the crash at Munich in which 23 people died, 8 being Manchester United footballers (Photo by Popperfoto/Getty Images)
The interior of the B,E,A, Elizabethan airliner G-ALZU "Lord Burghley" after the crash at Munich in which 23 people died, 8 being Manchester United footballers (Photo: Getty)
The interior of the B,E,A, Elizabethan airliner G-ALZU “Lord Burghley” after the crash at Munich in which 23 people died, 8 being Manchester United footballers (Photo: Getty)
The wreckage of the B,E,A, Elizabethan airliner G-ALZU "Lord Burghley" after the crash at Munich in which 23 people died, 8 being Manchester United footballers, about to be removed with the help of a crane (Photo: Getty)
The wreckage of the B,E,A, Elizabethan airliner G-ALZU “Lord Burghley” after the crash at Munich in which 23 people died, 8 being Manchester United footballers, about to be removed with the help of a crane (Photo: Getty)
Harry Gregg (left) and Bill Foulkes (right) at the crash site
Harry Gregg (left) and Bill Foulkes (right) at the crash site. Harry Gregg, who was the goal-keeper of United team, gained his consciousness after the crash and helped to save lives of few passengers including Vera Lukić, the wife of a Yugoslavian diplomat who was pregnant with her son, and her baby daughter, Vesna.
Ray Wood lays injured in hospital
Ray Wood lays injured in hospital
Captain Ken Rayment lies injured in hospital in Munich. Captain Rayment was co-pilot on the the ill-fated British airliner carrying the Manchester United football team
Captain Ken Rayment lies injured in hospital in Munich. Captain Rayment was co-pilot on the the ill-fated British airliner carrying the Manchester United football team
Sir Matt Busby lying in an oxygen tent in Munich Hospital (Photo: Keystone/Getty Images)
Sir Matt Busby lying in an oxygen tent in Munich Hospital (Photo: Keystone/Getty Images)
Supporters of Manchester United gather around the Old Trafford offices to hear news of the plane crash in Munich which killed 21.
Supporters of Manchester United gather around the Old Trafford offices to hear news of the plane crash in Munich which killed 21.
Bobby Charlton lays in hospital injured February 1958 who was injured in the Munich Air Disaster 19582 of 19
Bobby Charlton lays in hospital injured February 1958 who was injured in the Munich Air Disaster 1958.
Sir Bobby Charlton with Ken Morgan, who were friends as they grew up together at Manchester United, sharing light mood in the hospital.
Sir Bobby Charlton with Ken Morgan, who were friends as they grew up together at Manchester United, sharing light mood in the hospital.

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Duncan Edwards and John Berry in hospital beds
Duncan Edwards and John Berry in hospital beds
Manchester United's Kenny Morgans recovering in hospital after being injured in the Munich Air Disaster (Photo: Getty)
Manchester United’s Kenny Morgans recovering in hospital after being injured in the Munich Air Disaster (Photo: Getty)
Manchester United's Dennis Viollet and captain Bill Foulkes talk in a Munich hospital after the Munich aircrash
Manchester United’s Dennis Viollet and captain Bill Foulkes talk in a Munich hospital after the Munich aircrash

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Sir Matt Busby leaves Munich Hospital after the air disaster involving the Manchester United team - Professor Maurer says goodbye
Sir Matt Busby leaves Munich Hospital after the air disaster involving the Manchester United team – Professor Maurer says goodbye
Left: Manchester United manager Matt Busby smiles as he arrives in Manchester today from Munich. Top Right: Survivors Foulkes and Harry Gregg talk to journalists after the Munich air disaster. Bottom Right: Sir Bobby Charlton being treated.
Left: Manchester United manager Matt Busby smiles as he arrives in Manchester today from Munich. Top Right: Survivors Foulkes and Harry Gregg talk to journalists after the Munich air disaster. Bottom Right: Sir Bobby Charlton being treated.
11th February 1958, The B,E,A, aircraft carrying the coffins of the victims of the crash at Munich in which 23 people died, eight being Manchester United footballers, about to leave Munich Airport to return to England as a West German police guard of honour salute. Photograph: Popperfoto/Getty Images
11th February 1958, The B,E,A, aircraft carrying the coffins of the victims of the crash at Munich in which 23 people died, eight being Manchester United footballers, about to leave Munich Airport to return to England as a West German police guard of honour salute. Photograph: Popperfoto/Getty Images
After being discharged from hospital, Sir Matt Busby almost had given up football entirely, until he was told by his wife, Jean, "You know Matt, the lads would have wanted you to carry on."
After being discharged from hospital, Sir Matt Busby almost had given up football entirely and went into depression, until he was told by his wife, Jean, “You know Matt, the lads would have wanted you to carry on.”
A wreath is carried aboard the aeroplane transporting the body of Manchester United player Duncan Edwards from Munich to Manchester (Photo: Keystone/Getty Images)
A wreath is carried aboard the aeroplane transporting the body of Manchester United player Duncan Edwards from Munich to Manchester (Photo: Keystone/Getty Images)
Coffins of the victims returning to Manchester
Coffins of the victims returning to Manchester

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Mourners standing in silence as the coffin of Manchester United captain Roger Byrne is taken on its last journey to the crematorium.
Mourners standing in silence as the coffin of Manchester United captain Roger Byrne is taken on its last journey to the crematorium.
Gladstone Edwards (left) and Len Morgans, the fathers of two Manchester United players injured in the Munich air crash. They are preparing to travel to Germany to visit their sons (Duncan Edwards and Ken Morgans) in hospital. Duncan Edwards died as a result of his injuries on the 21 February 1958. Ken Morgans was the youngest survivor.
Gladstone Edwards (left) and Len Morgans, the fathers of two Manchester United players injured in the Munich air crash. They are preparing to travel to Germany to visit their sons (Duncan Edwards and Ken Morgans) in hospital. Duncan Edwards died as a result of his injuries on the 21 February 1958. Ken Morgans was the youngest survivor.
Manchester United Outside right Ken Morgans pictured with his fiancee Stephanie Lloyd driving away from Liverpool Street Station after returning from Munich.
Manchester United Outside right Ken Morgans pictured with his fiancee Stephanie Lloyd driving away from Liverpool Street Station after returning from Munich.
Manchester United in training, the first training session after the Munich air crash
Manchester United in training, the first training session after the Munich air crash
Captain James Thain, the pilot of the Munich air crash, amidst the crowds at Craven Cottage in London to watch Manchester United play Fulham, 7th September 1964. This is the first time he has watched Manchester United play since the accident. Twenty-three people died, including several members of the Manchester United football team, after their aircraft crashed on take-off from Munich-Riem Airport in Munich in 1958. (Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Captain James Thain, the pilot of the Munich air crash, amidst the crowds at Craven Cottage in London to watch Manchester United play Fulham, 7th September 1964. This is the first time he has watched Manchester United play since the accident. Twenty-three people died, including several members of the Manchester United football team, after their aircraft crashed on take-off from Munich-Riem Airport in Munich in 1958. (Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Photographs: The photographs are not owned by Goalden Times and we do not claim ownership of these images by any means. All the images are sole property of the respective owners. A huge thanks to The Mirror, Manchester Evening News, Huffingtonpost Uk, The Irish Times and Flashbak for the brilliant archive.

Britannian Fields – A Look into the Future and a Shame of the Present

Krishnendu Sanyal writes about St George’s Park national football centre, opened by the English Football Association in the hope of restructuring English football and the John Terry-Ashley Cole soap opera that has brought shame to English football

A step towards the future

The English national team, if you believe a few, are perennial underachievers and some will say they never even had the setup to be a top international team. The 1966 World Cup at home, was their last success on the international stage and they played some good football in Euro 1996, again held at home. Other than that, they have been a team who play mediocre football and get knocked out on quarter-final and semi-final stages of the big tournaments on penalties (mostly against Germany). The opening of St George’s Park (SGP) national football centre at Burton, on October 9, is a step in the right direction taken by the Football Association to wake English football up from its morbid state.
 
The national football centre was first discussed by the FA in 1975 and the land purchased in 2001 to build this state-of-the-art facility that the FA hopes, will bring out a new generation of English footballers who can bring success to a long suffering national team.

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Roy Hodgson, the current England manager, believes that the FA had its priorities wrong way round in concentration of the £757m revamp of the Wembley stadium before the national football centre. England needed a structure for its game before the New Wembley. Certainly, history will remark that the revamp of the national stadium sucked time, resources and energy of the FA, which could have been better utilised for the national football centre.

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The facilities at SGP are top-notch, including the best sports medicine and science centre in England, 12 full-sized pitches including one indoor, two Hilton hotels with 228 rooms between them, offices of the LMA (League Managers’ Association), the PFA (Professional Footballers’ Association) among others. Although, the FA admits that the hard work begins now and they need to make sure that it doesn’t become drainage of funds as the Wembley had. For that, they need to make sure that they maintain a steady flow of its own elite coaches but also other sports, who wish to use these facilities.

The FA has finally set up a facility that is consistent with their Future Game rhetoric.

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To make this new and exciting adventure work, FA needs full co-operation from some hostile factions. The FA’s new mantra of coaching the coaches will need to be tailored with the professional game’s elite player performance plan, under which the biggest clubs have invested millions into their own facilities to attract the best young players from around the British Isles.

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Although the FA is gleaming with joy in finally getting the facility out, they know that the facility’s effects on the broader English game will be felt in around a decade. While blowing the trumpet, the FA is playing for time. A cradle for English Football is ready, let us see what the future holds.

Terry and Cole have shamed England and Chelsea

Most public or private corporations would sack a leading figure who was found guilty of racism by an independent commission board as it brings unwanted filth on the corporation itself.

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John Terry was acquitted in a criminal trial at the Westminster magistrate’s court but the judge remarked that Terry’s defence was unlikely but he doesn’t have enough evidence for criminal conviction. The independent commission set up by the FA found him guilty of using racial language against a fellow professional. They concluded that Terry’s defence (that he was repeating Anton Ferdinand’s words) was “improbable, implausible and contrived“. They said there was “no credible evidence” for Terry’s defence.

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Suppose, a CEO of a big corporation was found guilty of saying, “You f***ing black c**t … f***ing knobhead!” to a competitor in public, by an independent commission, what will the corporation do?

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They will sack him.

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Chelsea has other questions to answer too. The independent commission detailed how Ashley Cole’s evidence evolved over time to further support Terry’s defence. The FA is accusing Cole (Terry’s principle witness) of lying in front of a commission. In his first statement to the FA, Cole had made no mention of the fact that he had heard Ferdinand using the word “black”. In a revised statement, he had the word inserted to corroborate with Terry’s defence.

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The club secretary, David Barnard, facilitated Ashley Cole’s change of evidence. The commission remarked that they had “very real concerns” on Barnard’s evidence and said that it was “materially defective”. This is a damning indictment of the club secretary. What would Chelsea do? What would any big corporation do?